From today’s arguments before the Court:

 

Kennedy said the Defense of Marriage Act appears to intrude on the power of states that have chosen to recognize same-sex marriages. When so many federal statutes are affected, “which in our society means that the federal government is intertwined with the citizens’ day-to-day life, you are at real risk of running in conflict with what has always been thought to be the essence of the state police power, which is to regulate marriage, divorce, custody,” Kennedy said.

If the court does strike down part of DOMA, it would represent a victory for gay rights advocates. But it would be something short of the endorsement of gay marriage nationwide that some envisioned when the justices agreed in December to hear the federal case and the challenge to California’s ban on same-sex marriage.

http://news.yahoo.com/boost-gay-marriage-justices-us-law-210143944–politics.html

The commentary from the Justices today is different than yesterday’s when discussing Prop 8. From my perspective, gay couples should receive the federal benefits afforded to married couples if they are in a documented committed relationship, i.e., civil unions.