Evidence against Zimmerman lacking on key issue

By Scott Hiaasen, Audra D.S. Burch and Frances Robles      The Miami Herald

Records released by prosecutors last week show little evidence that George Zimmerman acted with malice when he shot Trayvon Martin. Prosecutors will have to prove that intent in order to get a conviction for second-degree murder.

By Scott Hiaasen, Audra D.S. Burch and Frances Robles

shiaasen@miamiherald.com

            The stack of evidence released Thursday in the second-degree murder case against George Zimmerman is notable, legal experts say, for what’s not in it: firm evidence that Zimmerman acted with malice when he shot 17-year-old Trayvon Martin.

Special prosecutor Angela Corey filed a second-degree murder charge against Zimmerman last month, alleging that Zimmerman, a neighborhood crime-watch volunteer, acted with ill will when he shot Martin, a black teen, following a Feb. 26 scuffle behind some townhouses in a gated community in Sanford, where Martin was staying with his father.

But analysts say the evidence released thus far contains little information to support the prosecutor’s contention that Zimmerman acted with a “depraved mind” when he shot Trayvon — a standard the prosecution must meet if the murder charge is to stand.